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*Forever Torn*

What is the edgeworth box and how is it used in real life?

Jack:

In economics, an Edgeworth box, named after Francis Ysidro Edgeworth, is a way of representing various distributions of resources. Edgeworth made his presentation in his famous book, Mathematical Psychics: An essay on the application of mathematics to the moral sciences, 1881. Edgeworth's original two axis depiction was developed into the now familiar box diagram by Pareto in 1906 and was popularized in a later exposition by Bowley. The modern version of the diagram is commonly referred to as the Edgeworth-Bowley box.
The Edgeworth box is used frequently in general equilibrium theory, and can aid in finding the competitive equilibrium of a simple system.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgeworth_box

Gorden007:

In economics, an Edgeworth box, named after Francis Ysidro Edgeworth, is a way of representing various distributions of resources. Edgeworth made his presentation in his famous book, Mathematical Psychics: An essay on the application of mathematics to the moral sciences, 1881. Edgeworth's original two axis depiction was developed into the now familiar box diagram by Pareto in 1906 and was popularized in a later exposition by Bowley. The modern version of the diagram is commonly referred to as the Edgeworth-Bowley box.The Edgeworth box is used frequently in general equilibrium theory, and can aid in finding the competitive equilibrium of a simple system.Imagine two people (Octavio and Abby) with a fixed amount of resources between the two of them — say, 10 liters of water and 20 hamburgers. If Octavio takes 5 hamburgers and 4 liters of water, then Abby is left with 15 hamburgers and 6 liters of water. The Edgeworth box is a rectangular diagram with Octavio's Origin on one corner (represented by the O) and Abby's origin on the opposite corner (represented by the A). The width of the box is the total amount of one good, and the height is the total amount of the other good. Thus, every possible division of the goods between the two people can be represented as a point in the box.In theory, it is possible to draw among these points, indifference curves for both Abby and Octavio representing combinations of the goods that are of equal value, respectively, to Octavio and Abby. For example, Abby might value 1 liter of water and 13 hamburgers the same as 5 liters of water and 4 hamburgers, or 3 liters and 10 hamburgers. There is, of course, an infinity of such curves (assuming water and hamburgers to be infinitely divisible) that could be drawn among the combinations of goods for either consumer (Octavio or Abby). The indifference curve is often derived from each consumer's utility function.Wherever one of these curves for Abby happens to just touch (b

Skullz5:

i would of said that to scot d but i guess he just has those answers down real good.

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